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Northern B.C. averages over 50 casualty crashes every February

ICBC claims the region’s statistic is an ‘all-time high’ for the province
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car snow crash
Car crashed into a snowy ditch off the road (via Shutterstock)

Slow down!

That message appears to be simple from the province's largest insurance corporation, particularly in the North Central region above others based on recently crunched numbers.

According to ICBC, 51 casualty crashes occur in the month of February every year in the north.

The data, given to ICBC from local police, is based on a five-year average between 2013 and 2017, and the incidents are mainly a result of vehicles going too fast on slick road conditions, as well as the unpredictable weather.

“Winter weather presents its own set of challenging road conditions for drivers,” says ICBC in a statement. “Namely, black ice, heavy snowfall and freezing rain. Road conditions in northern B.C. are changing every day. In bad weather, slow down, increase your following distance and allow extra travel time.”

Some tips for staying safe on the roads this time of year include:

Focusing your full attention on the road

  • Use extra caution when approaching intersections and corners
  • Use your headlights and taillights whenever weather is poor and visibility is reduced
  • Make sure your tires are rated for the conditions you'll be driving in
  • Check your tire pressure regularly
    • Pressure drops in cold weather and overinflated tires can reduce gripping
  • Clear off snow on your vehicle
    • Headlights, wheel wells, and external sensors
  • Carpool with a confident driver
    • Take a taxi, work from home, or wait until crews clear major roads
  • Use extreme caution around snow plows



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Kyle  Balzer

About the Author: Kyle Balzer

Kyle Balzer graduated with distinction from BCIT's Broadcast & Online Journalism program in 2016. Since moving to Prince George, he has covered a variety of stories from education & Indigenous relations, to community interests & sports.
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