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You can't smoke pot on campus: UNBC and CNC

Marijuana will be treated just the same as alcohol at both post-secondary institutions
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Marijuana may be legal now across the country, but that doesn't mean you are free to smoke it anywhere you want. 

The College of New Caledonia and the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) have updated their school policies to reflect the rules when it comes to pot on campus.

CNC has listed the following rules: 

"As a result of the new federal Cannabis Act, CNC has updated its substance use and abuse policy." the school website reads. "Impairment from recreational cannabis will be treated the same way as alcohol consumption on all campuses. Consumption of any product that may cause impairment in any form is not permitted."

Employees, contractors and visitors:

  • Recreational marijuana — as is already the case with alcohol and other drugs — is not permitted on all CNC campus buildings
  • Employees, contractors and visitors seen smoking on campus will be reported to human resources and the matter will be addressed on a case-by-case basis
  • Requests for medical marijuana accommodations can be made through human resources

Students: 

  • This policy ties to the standards of conduct — student responsibility and accountability policy
  • Students smoking on campus will be asked to leave by security and the incident will be recorded in their student file
  • Multiple violations of the substance use and abuse policy can lead to further repercussions, including suspension 
  • Requests for marijuana accommodations can be made through student services

"CNC supports safe, healthy, learning and working environments free of drugs and intoxication. Please report those under the influence of marijuana, alcohol, or other substances, or use a red phone (Prince George campus) and dial 200 to contact security," states the website.

 

UNBC has listed the following rules: 

  • According to the UNBC smoke and vape-free places policy, the smoking and vaping of cannabis products is prohibited on all university property and in UNBC vehicles whether owned, leased, managed by or operated by UNBC
  • Cannabis products or devices are permitted on campus to the extent it is otherwise lawful (age, amount, type, etc.) but must be stored in sealed, scent-proof containers when not in use

  • The sale, promotion or distribution of all cannabis products is strictly prohibited on all UNBC campuses or at any facility owned, managed or leased by UNBC

  • The possession or cultivation of cannabis plants is prohibited anywhere on campus property, including the residences, except where prior approval for research purposes has been obtained

"All members of the UNBC community share a collective responsibility to maintain a clean, healthy and safe working and learning environment and to positively comply with these changes in legislation," the school's website reads.

Any student with a documented medical need to use cannabis products must register with the UNBC Access Resource Centre. Documented medical needs will be assessed and reasonable accommodation made if the school can do so without undue hardship.

Any employee with a documented medical need to use cannabis products must register with human resources. 

The university will also prohibit growing of marijuana plants on campus. While it is legal to grow up to four plants, the school says the accommodations are shared spaces and there could be safety concerns, the smell and additional uses of resources including heat and water. 

An individual may have cannabis products on campus, but the amounts are not allowed to exceed the legal limit of 30 grams of dried cannabis or 450 grams of cannabis edibles and they must be in sealed, scent proof containers. 

As for edibles, they can be consumed but must be consumed responsibly. 




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Jess Fedigan

About the Author: Jess Fedigan

Jess Fedigan graduated from BCIT’s broadcast and online journalism program in 2016. Her career (so far) has taken her to Fort St. John, Victoria and now Prince George.
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